Apple Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. et al

Filing 142

OPPOSITION to ( 135 MOTION to Compel Discovery of Documents, Information, or Objects from Non-Party Google, Inc. ) filed by Google Inc.. (Candido, Amy) (Filed on 4/28/2012) Modified text on 4/30/2012 (dhm, COURT STAFF).

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1     Amy H. Candido amycandido@quinnemanuel.com Matthew S. Warren matthewwarren@quinnemanuel.com QUINN EMANUEL URQUHART & SULLIVAN, LLP 50 California Street, 22nd Floor San Francisco, California 94111-4788 (415) 875-6600 (415) 875-6700 facsimile   Attorneys for Non-Party Google Inc.   UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT  NORTHERN DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA  SAN JOSE DIVISION   APPLE INC., a California corporation,   Plaintiff, v.  SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS CO., LTD., a Korean corporation; SAMSUNG  ELECTRONICS AMERICA, INC., a New York corporation, and SAMSUNG  TELECOMMUNICATIONS AMERICA, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company,  Defendants.  SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS CO., LTD., a  Korean corporation; SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS AMERICA, INC., a New  York corporation, and SAMSUNG TELECOMMUNICATIONS AMERICA,  LLC, a Delaware limited liability company,   CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK NON-PARTY GOOGLE INC.’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE INC.’S MOTION TO COMPEL DISCOVERY OF DOCUMENTS, INFORMATION OR OBJECTS Hearing: Date: Time: Place: Judge: May 1, 2012 10:00 a.m. PDT Courtroom 5, Fourth Floor Hon. Paul S. Grewal Counterclaim-Plaintiff, v.  APPLE INC., a California corporation,  Counterclaim-Defendant  CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 This is a manufactured controversy. Plaintiff and counterclaim-defendant Apple Inc. 2 (“Apple”) delayed in serving non-party Google Inc. (“Google”) with two expansive subpoenas, 3 running out the clock for six full weeks after the Court authorized discovery relevant to its motion 4 for a preliminary injunction. Apple sought from Google, on an extremely accelerated time-frame, 5 documents and testimony regarding a broad swath of information including, for example, all 6 communications between Google and Samsung relating to any aspect of Android; all communi7 cations between Google and Samsung relating to any aspect of Apple or its products, and all 8 documents regarding those communications; and any analysis of Apple products, whether or not 9 related to the accused functionality or even to Android. Google had three responses. First, 10 Google objected to requests seeking information beyond the accused functionality, such as all 11 communications with Samsung regarding any aspect of Android, as burdensome, irrelevant and 12 unauthorized by the Court’s order allowing “discovery relevant to the preliminary injunction 13 motion.” Second, Google explained that Apple’s delay in serving its subpoena prevented it from 14 producing most documents in time for Apple to file its reply brief, although Google could and 15 would produce source code compiled into the accused device – which Apple agreed was its 16 highest priority – and could also produce witnesses to testify regarding the accused functionality. 17 Third, Google requested that Apple slightly modify the protective order governing confidentiality 18 of Google’s highly confidential source code, as Apple and Google have done in other actions. 19 Apple initially appeared amenable to negotiation, but then turned on a dime, declared it 20 was filing a motion to compel, and refused to narrow a single request in either subpoena. Google 21 repeatedly pressed Apple to narrow the issues in dispute, and Apple repeatedly refused. Tellingly, 22 Apple failed to allow the in-person lead counsel meet-and-confer discussion the Court has 23 required before discovery motions in this action. As a result, Apple’s motion includes far too 24 many issues, including some on which the parties should have reached agreement, and some 25 which are premature. 26 The primary issue for the Court to resolve, however, remains the timing of Google’s 27 document production. Google has committed to produce testimony regarding the accused 28 functionality, and has already offered one deposition that Apple has refused to take. Google has -1- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 also committed to produce source code compiled into the accused device, and could have 2 completed this production in time for Apple’s brief had Apple served its subpoenas when it should 3 have, on February 22, 2012. But by April 5, when Apple decided to serve its subpoenas, Google 4 could not, by the Court’s deadline for Apple’s reply brief, complete the complex and 5 interdependent processes of locating, gathering and collecting documents; ensuring that its 6 collection was complete; assembling and training a document review team; supervising and 7 completing responsiveness review; resolving any second-level questions generated during this 8 review; reviewing for privilege; and formatting and verifying the documents for production. 9 Apple tenders a single, sad excuse for its delay: it claims that it could not subpoena Google before 10 asking the Samsung defendants and counterclaimants (“collectively, “Samsung”) to produce the 11 source code running on the Galaxy Nexus. But Apple cannot square this excuse with the now-too12 long history of Apple’s Android-related litigation, which shows Apple’s firm understanding that 13 only Google could provide the source code underlying the Galaxy Nexus. 14 As everyone in the mobile industry knows, Android devices largely fall into two 15 categories: a small number of “lead devices” bearing Google’s “Nexus” trademark and running 16 Google’s stock build of Android, and other devices including software customized by the device 17 maker, or OEM. For a major Android release – such as Ice Cream Sandwich – Google and an 18 OEM together launch a lead device running the new release. Critically, Google retains control of 19 lead devices’ platform software, providing the OEM with only binaries for installation. For lead 20 devices, Google is the authoritative source – indeed, the only source – from which to obtain 21 original, pre-compilation Android platform code. This has been widely reported, discussed, 22 analyzed and debated in the technology press and the mobile industry. Indeed, Google itself 23 promoted the Samsung Galaxy Nexus as a lead device including “the best Google mobile services 24 and fastest updates directly from Google.” (Martin Decl. Ex. 1.) Apple’s own litigation filings 25 show that it knew all this at least as early as August 2010, and probably earlier than that. Indeed, 26 since then, Apple has subpoenaed Google nine times in at least eight different actions regarding 27 Android, each time demanding source code for lead devices, and Google has repeatedly produced 28 this source code in response. -2- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 For all these reasons, Apple could and should have subpoenaed Google – not to mention 2 carriers such as Verizon that sell the lion’s share of Galaxy Nexus devices – on February 22, 2012, 3 the day the Court allowed preliminary-injunction discovery. Apple’s eventual subpoenas 4 contained nothing unique to this action; to the contrary, every request is word-for-word or 5 substantially identical to requests from prior Apple subpoenas – usually many times over. Instead 6 Apple ran out the clock for six weeks, leaving Google insufficient time to respond to the 7 subpoenas. The Court should therefore deny Apple’s motion to compel in its entirety, allowing 8 Google to produce documents regarding the accused functionality during normal Rule 26 9 discovery, instead of rewarding Apple’s overbroad requests and unjustified delay. 10 11 FACTUAL BACKGROUND A. 12 Apple Commences a Broad Campaign of Litigation Against Various Android Device Makers, and Repeatedly Subpoenas Google in Each Action, Seeking the Same Information Apple Now Contends It Didn’t Know Google Had 13 On March 2, 2010, Apple filed three actions against HTC, alleging infringement of twenty 14 patents. Certain Personal Data and Mobile Communications Devices and Related Software, Inv. 15 No. 337-TA-710 (U.S.I.T.C.); Apple Inc. v. High Tech Computer Corp. et al., No. 10-166 16 (D. Del.); Apple Inc. v. High Tech Computer Corp. et al., No. 10-167 (D. Del.). Although Apple’s 17 District Court actions and its I.T.C. investigation named only HTC, much of Apple’s ire was 18 directed at Google. As quoted by his biographer, Apple’s founder and CEO Steve Jobs stated: 19 20 21 Our lawsuit is saying, “Google, you . . . ripped off the iPhone, wholesale ripped us off.” Grand theft. I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, and I will spend every penny of Apple’s $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong. I’m going to destroy Android, because it’s a stolen product. I’m willing to go thermonuclear war on this. 22 (Martin Decl. Ex. 2 at 3.) Apple was true to its founder’s word. Since filing the first action and 23 investigation against HTC, Apple has brought no fewer than eight actions against HTC, Motorola 24 and Samsung. Certain Mobile Devices and Related Software, Inv. No. 337-TA-750 (U.S.I.T.C.); 25 Certain Electronic Digital Media Devices and Components Thereof, Inv. No. 337-TA-796 26 (U.S.I.T.C. ); Certain Portable Electronic Devices and Related Software, Inv. No. 337-TA-797 27 (U.S.I.T.C. ); Apple Inc. v. Motorola, Inc., No. 11-8540 (N.D. Ill.); Apple Inc. v. Motorola, Inc., 28 No. 10-23580 (S.D. Fla.); Apple Inc. v. Motorola Mobility, Inc., No. 12-20271 (S.D. Fla.); Apple -3- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., No. 11-1846 (N.D. Cal.); this action. Apple has subpoenaed 2 Google in each of these actions, and in various actions has repeatedly sought from Google 3 production of source code for its lead devices. 4 This is no surprise: Apple’s first Android litigation, Apple v. HTC, Inv. No. 337-710 5 before the International Trade Commission, established that Apple understood full well Google’s 6 role in Android development, as well as the difference between lead devices (controlled by 7 Google) and other devices (controlled by OEMs). In that investigation, Google moved to quash 8 portions of Apple’s overbroad subpoena, including requests seeking Google’s knowledge of 9 source code on devices controlled by HTC. As the ALJ explained in issuing his order, Google’s 10 argument depended on the distinction between lead and non-lead devices: 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Google additionally submits that the deposition topics are overbroad and unduly burdensome “because Google does not have, and cannot be expected to have, detailed knowledge of how HTC’s products work, as opposed to how the Android platform works before it is modified by HTC.” Id. In that regard, Google states that it develops Android source code and makes it freely available under an open source license for downloading and customization for use in a product. “After receiving the Android code, HTC and others are free to add, delete or modify any portion of such code to suit their needs.” Id. Nonetheless, Google acknowledges that three exceptions apply with respect to HTC. Google states that it does have information regarding the Android software to be used in the HTC Nexus One Handset, the HTC Dream (marketed as the T-Mobile G1) handset, and myTouch 3G handset. Google is, therefore, willing to provide a witness to testify regarding its knowledge of the Android code installed in these three products. 18 (Martin Decl. Ex. 3 at 3-4.) Thus as far back as September 28, 2010, Google explained to Apple, 19 and Apple understood, that OEMs could provide information regarding source code compiled into 20 non-lead devices, while Google could provide information regarding lead devices – including the 21 first “Nexus” branded lead device, the Nexus One. Indeed, on October 28, 2010, Google produced 22 a computer containing source code compiled into the lead devices. (Martin Decl. Ex. 4.) 23 Apple kept suing Android device makers, and Apple and Google fell into a familiar 24 pattern: Apple would subpoena Google seeking information including source code for lead 25 devices, and Google would provide that information. Over and over again, Apple demonstrated its 26 understanding that Google could provide lead-device code, while OEMs could provide code for 27 other devices. For example, in Certain Mobile Devices and Related Software, No. 337-TA-750 28 (U.S.I.T.C.), Apple “confirmed that in this investigation Apple seeks [from Google] only Android -4- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 operating system files for builds corresponding to the two accused Motorola lead devices: the 2 Motorola Droid and Xoom.” (Martin Decl. Ex. 5.) Google produced a computer containing this 3 source code. (Martin Decl. Ex. 6.) Similarly, in Apple Inc. v. Motorola Inc. et al., No. 11-01846 4 (N.D. Ill.), Apple acknowledged that Google need produce only source code for the same two 5 devices (Martin Decl. Ex. 7 at 3), and Google again produced a source-code computer. (Martin 6 Decl. Ex. 8.) Finally, in Apple Inc. v. Motorola, Inc., et al., No. 10-23580 (S.D. Fla.), Apple again 7 confirmed that it sought source code and testimony regarding the same two accused lead devices. 8 (Martin Decl. Ex. 9.) Again, Google produced a computer containing this highly confidential 9 source code. (Martin Decl. Ex. 10.) 10 B. 11 On December 15, 2011, the Galaxy Nexus went on sale in the United States. (Docket No. Google and Samsung Promote the Galaxy Nexus as a Google Lead Device 12 10 at 7.) Google directly promoted the Galaxy Nexus, including video advertisements under the 13 “Google Nexus” brand at http://www.youtube.com/user/googlenexus/custom, as well as a web site 14 at http://www.google.com/nexus/. Under the first tab, “features,” this Web site stated: 15 16 17 18 19 (Martin Decl. Ex. 1.) If this were not enough, Google’s contribution to the Galaxy Nexus was 20 firmly shown by software on the phone itself: when turned on or rebooted, the first word 21 displayed by the Galaxy Nexus is “Google.” 22 The Galaxy Nexus received extensive media coverage in both technology blogs and 23 mainstream media, which emphasized its role as Google’s lead device for the Ice Cream Sandwich 24 Android release. See, e.g., Martin Decl. Ex. 11 (calling the Galaxy Nexus “the newest Google 25 phone”); Martin Decl. Ex. 12 (describing “Google’s line of Nexus smartphones” and the Galaxy 26 Nexus as “the launch device for Google’s highly anticipated new version of Android – Ice Cream 27 Sandwich – the company’s most significant mobile OS update yet”). In short, even if Apple did 28 not know that the Galaxy Nexus was a Google-branded, lead device with code maintained by -5- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 Google – and the conduct of prior litigation between Apple and Google firmly establishes that 2 Apple did know all this – there was no way it could have avoided learning this information from 3 the coverage of the product launch. 4 5 6 C. Despite Knowing It Should Promptly Subpoena Google, Apple Delays Doing So For Six Weeks, Instead Engaging in the Empty Exercise of Asking Samsung Questions to Which Apple Already Knew the Answers On February 8, 2012, Apple filed this action as well as its motion for a preliminary 7 injunction. (Docket Nos. 1, 10.) On February 22, the Court entered its Order Setting Briefing and 8 Hearing Schedule for Preliminary Injunction Motion, which authorized “discovery relevant to the 9 preliminary injunction motion.” (Docket No. 37 at 2:4.) Although one would normally expect 10 Apple – which stated in its motion for a preliminary injunction that resolution of this matter was 11 “essential to prevent immediate and irreparable harm to Apple” – to subpoena Google the next 12 day, Apple did not do so. (Docket No. 10 at 1.) Indeed, Apple did not even serve discovery on 13 Samsung until two weeks later, on March 6, 2012. Despite knowing that it should seek source 14 code from non-party Google (see supra §§ A, B), Apple sought this code only from Samsung. Of 15 course, Samsung responded that that the “source code for the version of Ice Cream Sandwich used 16 on Galaxy Nexus was written by Google, not Samsung, Samsung does not have possession of the 17 source code; Google provides Samsung with object code in binary form to be installed onto the 18 Galaxy Nexus.” (Martin Decl. Ex. 13 at 7.) Still Apple did not subpoena Google. Instead Apple 19 waited two more days, and then told Samsung that its responses were somehow insufficient – 20 although it is difficult to imagine what could be unclear about Samsung’s description regarding 21 the source code. (Martin Decl. Ex. 14 at 1.) Samsung again replied, stating: “As Samsung made 22 clear in these interrogatory responses – and as Samsung states once again – the source code for the 23 version of Ice Cream Sandwich used on Galaxy Nexus was written by Google, not Samsung. 24 Samsung does not have possession of that source code. To Samsung’s knowledge, the only 25 company in possession of the source code used on Galaxy Nexus is Google.” (Martin Decl. Ex. 26 24.) No longer able to bury its head in the sand, Apple finally subpoenaed Google on April 5, 27 2012. But by then over six weeks had elapsed since the Court allowed discovery, while Apple 28 first did nothing and then engaged in the empty exercise of asking Samsung for source code it -6- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 knew was held by Google. Worse, there was nothing new in Apple’s subpoenas; to the contrary, 2 all of their topics were word-for-word or substantially identical to requests from prior Apple 3 subpoenas – usually many times over. (See generally Appendix A.) In short, there was no reason 4 whatsoever for Apple to wait a single day to subpoena Google after the Court allowed preliminary 5 injunction discovery on February 22, 2012. Instead, of course, Apple waited six weeks. 6 Those lost weeks were critical: instead of having eleven weeks to respond to Apple’s 7 subpoena before Apple filed its brief, Apple’s delay tactics gave Google just five. The collection 8 required by Apple’s broad subpoena is a challenging one. Apple seeks (at the very least) detailed 9 technical information regarding four disparate areas of Android software. Two of the teams 10 developing accused functionality – the Quick Search Box and the Android Keyboard – are located 11 in London and Tokyo. Simply to complete its technical production, Google must collect 12 documents from all four teams, including some in Japanese; confirm that the documents it has 13 collected are complete; assemble and train a document review team; supervise and complete 14 review for responsiveness to the Subpoenas; consider and resolve the second-level questions that 15 inevitably arise during first-level review; review responsive documents for privilege and resolve 16 second-level questions that arise during this review; and supervise the vendor’s formatting and 17 verification of documents for production. These steps take 4-6 weeks to complete even for the 18 simplest document production. This production Apple seeks in this action is more complex and, 19 as a result, for Apple’s requested production the minimum time to produce technical documents is 20 6-8 weeks. But of course, because of Apple’s needless six-week delay, by the time it received the 21 Subpoenas Google had only five weeks to complete its technical production. 22 23 24 D. Apple Refuses to Take the Deposition of Ken Wakasa, Whom Google Offered For Deposition on Friday, April 27, 2012, the Same Date on Which Apple Requested a Much Broader Deposition on All Its Noticed Topics. Apple requested testimony from Google on 12 topics, including all four of the accused 25 technologies. (Docket No. 135-1, Ex. 3.) Apple stated firmly: “The deposition will begin at 9:30 26 on April 27, 2012.” One of Google’s declarants and designees, Ken Wakasa, lives and works in 27 Japan but was visiting Mountain View for unrelated reasons. Google seized this opportunity and 28 offered him for deposition a day earlier than Apple wanted, on April 26, 2012. Usually attorneys -7- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 prosecuting preliminary injunction motions “essential to prevent immediate and irreparable harm” 2 to their clients are thrilled to receive offers of early depositions. (Docket No. 10 at 1.) Not Apple 3 in this case, though. Instead Apple called Google on April 23, 2012, to say a Thursday deposition 4 fell too soon after Samsung’s Monday brief. (Martin Decl. Ex. 15.) Later that day, Google wrote 5 Apple to re-offer Mr. Wakasa on April 27, 2012, the date on which Apple originally requested a 6 much broader deposition: 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 I write to finalize plans regarding the deposition of Ken Wakasa. As we discussed today, Mr. Wakasa lives and works in Tokyo, Japan, as does the team responsible for Android Keyboard, which Apple has accused of infringing the '172 patent. For unrelated reasons, however, Mr. Wakasa is in Mountain View for the rest of this week. Next week is Golden Week in Japan when, as I'm sure you know, the country essentially shuts down. For the two weeks after that, business and family commitments prevent Mr. Wakasa from leaving Japan; again, as you know, it would be illegal to depose him there. For all these reasons, we offered Mr. Wakasa on Thursday, April 26. In response, you said Apple could not be ready in time for this deposition, because it fell too soon after Samsung's opposition brief. In light of your statements, Mr. Wakasa has rearranged his schedule so he can be deposed a day later, Friday, April 27, 2012. The deposition will commence at 8:00 a.m. PDT, and will have a hard stop at 4:00 p.m. PDT, so that Mr. Wakasa can make his flight back to Japan in time for Golden Week. We expect Apple to depose Mr. Wakasa on Friday. As you know, Apple’s notice of deposition sought testimony that day on all four preliminary injunction patents. If you cannot actually take a deposition on only one of those patents, then we question the urgency of your case. 17 (Id. at 1-2.) Amazingly, Apple again refused to proceed with Mr. Wakasa’s deposition, even on 18 the date it itself had noticed. (Martin Decl. Ex. 16 at 2.) Google repeated that Mr. Wakasa’s 19 schedule gave no leeway to proceed at an alternative time, and that Mr. Wakasa’s deposition 20 would go forward as originally noticed by Apple. (Martin Decl. Ex. 17.) Apple did not reply. 21 Google’s counsel, Samsung’s counsel, and Mr. Wakasa arrived for his deposition at 8:00 a.m. 22 PDT this past Friday, but Apple did not attend. 23 E. 24 Aside from Mr. Wakasa, Google has offered deposition dates for its other four declarants, Apple Has Not Confirmed Or Even Addressed Google’s Other Depositions. 25 and has designated them as Google’s witnesses under Rule 30(b)(6) on deposition topics 2, 7 & 8. 26 (Martin Decl. Ex. 18 & 19.) All of Google’s witnesses rearranged their very busy schedules, and 27 Mr. Clark and Mr. Bringert agreed to travel thousands of miles to the Northern District of 28 -8- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 California, in order to make these depositions possible in the limited time available. Apple has not 2 confirmed these depositions or even responded to Google on this point. 3 F. 4 Apple Flouts This Court’s Order Requiring a Pre-Motion, In-Person MeetAnd-Confer Discussion Among Lead Counsel, Admitting It Is Doing So But Contending the Requirement Does Not Apply Because Google Is Not a Party 5 Instead of working with Google to schedule depositions and address other issues between 6 Apple and Google, Apple told Google its positions were non-negotiable and proceeded to file its 7 motion to compel. In so doing, Apple ignored the Court’s repeated and firm orders, in both this 8 action and the prior action between Apple and Samsung, allowing discovery motions only after 9 lead counsel meet and confer – and do so in person. When Google challenged Apple on this point, 10 Apple stated that this rule does not apply because Google is not a party to this action. Apple’s 11 Motion thus flouts both the letter and the spirit of the Court’s repeated rulings. 12 On August 24, 2011, the Court first barred discovery motions without a pre-motion, in- 13 person meet-and-confer discussion among lead counsel: 14 15 THE COURT: I’m going to require, and I’m sure he will agree, that lead trial counsel have to meet in person to meet and confer on any discovery dispute before your file a motion. Okay? 16 MR. MCELHINNY: Thank you, Your Honor. 17 (Martin Decl. Ex. 20 at 83:11-15.) The Court evidently considered this requirement to be 18 successful because, in allowing discovery to commence, the Court also ordered: 19 20 21 The Court encourages the parties to make all efforts to keep discovery requests reasonable in scope and narrowly tailored to address the preliminary injunction motion. If disputes arise, the parties must make a good faith effort to reach a mutually agreeable compromise, and lead trial counsel must meet and confer in person, before bringing the dispute before the Court. 22 (Docket No. 37 at 2:7-10.) Apple has attempted to avoid this requirement before. At a hearing on 23 September 28, 2011, Apple asked this Court for “anything in other cases that you have found 24 satisfactory as a substitute for lead counsel meeting and conferring in person that you would be 25 open to . . . .” (Martin Decl. Ex. 21 at 4:23 – 5:2.) This Court firmly declined to alter the 26 requirement. (Id. at 5:5-9.) When Apple and Samsung again asked the Court for relief from the 27 in-person, lead-counsel meet-and-confer requirement, the Court again firmly declined to alter the 28 -9- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 requirement. (No. 11-1846, Docket No. 811.) The Court’s intention could not be clearer: no 2 discovery motions can proceed without an in-person meeting between lead counsel. 3 Despite all this, Apple refused to obey the Court’s order and file its motion only after 4 completing the required in-person meet-and-confer discussion. When Google requested an in5 person meet-and-confer discussion (Martin Decl. Ex. 22.), Apple responded that the in-person 6 meet-and-confer requirement “applies only to disputes between the parties in the case.” (Martin 7 Decl. Ex. 23.) Google repeatedly asked Apple to explain the basis for this view (e.g., Martin Decl. 8 Ex. 20.) but Apple refused. 9 ARGUMENT 10 Largely because of Apple’s failure to meet and confer, the Court must address far too 11 many issues in resolving this motion. First, the Court must determine whether it can be heard at 12 all, given Apple’s failure to allow the required in-person meet and confer between lead counsel. 13 Should it allow the motion to proceed, the Court would next consider the scope of Google’s 14 production, and whether it must include documents far afield of the accused functionality, which 15 Apple continues to demand. Third, the Court would consider the timing of Google’s production of 16 documents, which Apple contends must be immediate, despite Google’s explanation that this 17 simply cannot be so. Fourth and related, the Court must rule on Apple’s apparent request to re18 depose Mr. Wasaka, despite its failure to take his deposition on the date originally noticed by 19 Apple. Fifth, the Court should determine whether to grant non-party Google additional 20 protections under the protective order governing confidentiality in this action. Sixth and finally, 21 the Court should address Apple’s other arguments regarding possible future objections, which it 22 can easily dismiss as premature. 23 I. 24 The Court Should Deny Apple’s Motion Outright For Its Failure to Undertake the Required In-Person, Pre-Motion Meet and Confer Between Lead Counsel, Thus Flouting the Court’s Repeated Orders Requiring Such Conferences 25 There is no dispute that Apple’s “lead trial counsel” did not “meet and confer in person, 26 before bringing the dispute before the Court.” (Docket No. 37 at 2:7-10.) Apple’s Motion admits 27 that its meet-and-confer efforts are fully described in Jason Lo’s declaration (Motion at xvi:8-13), 28 but Mr. Lo’s declaration describes only telephonic discussions between non-lead counsel. -10- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 (Docket No. 135-1 ¶ 6.) Tellingly, Apple’s motion does not address or even mention its utter 2 failure to follow the Court’s repeated Orders, although Google had repeatedly stated its belief that 3 Apple was in violation. Apple earlier told Google that “Judge Koh’s order” requiring pre-motion 4 in-person meet-and-confer “applies only to disputes between the parties in the case.” (Martin 5 Decl. Ex. 23.) Apple is evidently referring to the word “parties” in the second sentence below: 6 7 8 The Court encourages the parties to make all efforts to keep discovery requests reasonable in scope and narrowly tailored to address the preliminary injunction motion. If disputes arise, the parties must make a good faith effort to reach a mutually agreeable compromise, and lead trial counsel must meet and confer in person, before bringing the dispute before the Court. 9 (Docket No. 37 at 2:7-10.) There are two sensible ways to read this order, and one nonsensical 10 one; Apple of course has chosen the latter. Google believes the order requires any party to a 11 discovery dispute, whether or not also a party to the case, to meet and confer before filing a 12 discovery motion. Thus, for example, the order would require Google to meet and confer in 13 person before filing a motion to quash. It would also be reasonable, although Google believes 14 incorrect, to read the Order as governing only Apple and Samsung, as parties to the action, in any 15 discovery dispute. It is patently unreasonable, however, to read the Order as applying only to 16 disputes Apple and Samsung have with each other, and not with non-parties such as Google. If 17 the wording of the Order were not enough, the Court’s repeated Orders have made crystal clear its 18 intention to restrain Apple and Samsung from filing discovery motions; Apple’s reading would 19 flip the order to protect Apple and Samsung more than non-parties such as Google. This reason 20 cannot be squared with the Court’s strong history of enforcing the Order. 21 Apple’s failure to honor the Court’s order also aptly illustrated the reasons for the Court’s 22 order itself. Apple’s non-lead counsel refused during any meet and confer to narrow any of 23 Apple’s requests, indicate which portions of those requests he felt were most important, or engage 24 in any meaningful discussion with Google about anything. Instead Apple’s position, stated 25 repeatedly, was that Google should produce 100% of the documents Apple demanded before 26 Apple filed its brief – even though Google explained it was impossible to do so. The Court need 27 not take our word for it; that is how Apple’s non-lead counsel himself summarized his position 28 during the parties’ all-too-brief telephonic discussions: -11- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 Second, we wholeheartedly agree that Judge Koh encouraged “the parties to make all efforts to keep discovery requests reasonable in scope and narrowly tailored to address the preliminary injunction motion.” But we do not believe that this directive requires Apple to unreasonably narrow the scope of its discovery. As I have stated to both you and to Mr. Warren, Apple believes that the discovery it served on Google is appropriately narrow. Accordingly, while I am happy to discuss the issues further with you, we do not believe that the meet and confer rules require that we further narrow our already-tailored requests. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 (Martin Decl. Ex. 25.) The Court ordered lead counsel to meet and confer in person precisely because such rigid and extreme positions rarely survive such meetings. Apple’s failure to tender its lead counsel, and the line adopted by its non-lead counsel, prevented any meaningful premotion meet and confer discussions from occurring. Google repeatedly asked Apple if there were particular documents it wanted; if there was a simpler subset of documents Google might be able to produce before Apple filed its brief on May 14, or if there was any other way the parties could narrow their differences. In response, Apple’s non-lead counsel simply repeated the statement above. Apple’s failure to meet and confer as required is both undisputed and fatal, and the Court should deny Apple’s motion for this reason alone. To rule otherwise would reward Apple for flouting the Court’s authority, strongly encouraging its continued future violations of the Order.1 II. Apple Has Not Met Its Burden to Show That It Should Receive Discovery Beyond That Agreed by Google 18 Apple’s motion addresses a mélange of topics, including many to which Google has 19 already committed to provide documents or testimony, subject of course to its objections. Google 20 has already agreed to produce testimony regarding Deposition Topics 2, 7 & 8, and has offered 21 witnesses on these topics. (Martin Decl. Ex. 18 & 19.) Apple has not responded to this offer. 22 Google has similarly agreed to produce testimony regarding Topic 5, although it cannot do so 23 before Apple’s brief is due on May 14. Finally, Google has agreed, subject to its objections, to 24 provide documents responsive to Request 6 & 8. Still, other topics remain in dispute. They have 25 two things in common: each disputed topic seeks documents or testimony far afield of the 26 27 28 1 Of course, Apple’s failure to brief this issue at all, despite Google’s repeated statements that Apple was not in compliance, waives Apple’s right to bring any further arguments on this point. -12- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 accused functionality; and, for each, Apple has not met its burden of showing entitlement to 2 discovery. 3 A. 4 5 Apple’s Request For “Differences” Between Open Source Code and Code Compiled Onto the Galaxy Nexus is Irrelevant, Burdensome on Google, and Would Reveal Google’s Trade Secrets Without Helping Apple in this Action Google has agreed to produce source code compiled into the Samsung Galaxy Nexus, 6 satisfying Apple’s need to understand what happens on the accused phone. But Apple goes 7 further, demanding documents and testimony regarding “[t]he differences, if any,” between the 8 code actually used on the accused phones and “the Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich code publicly 9 available from https://android.googlesource.com/platform/manifest, or through the process 10 described at http://source.android.com/source/downloading.html.” This request has several flaws, 11 each fatal. 12 13 1. The Open Source Code is Irrelevant to This Action Against Samsung In this action, Apple accuses only Samsung of infringement; the preliminary injunction 14 motion accuses only the Samsung Galaxy Nexus. Under these circumstances, the only software 15 that affects Apple’s infringement analysis is software used by Samsung in the Galaxy Nexus; 16 Google has already agreed to produce source code underlying that software. The open-source 17 code is not loaded on Samsung’s Galaxy Nexus device and cannot be relevant to Apple’s 18 infringement claims against Samsung generally or the Galaxy Nexus in particular. 19 20 2. Apple’s Request Would Reveal Critical Google Trade Secrets Although Google releases some versions of Android through the Android Open Source 21 Project, the internal functionality of Android running on the Samsung Galaxy Nexus is Google’s 22 trade secret. Apple’s request would give attorneys for Apple – Google’s competitor and the 23 architect of a sustained litigation campaign against Android device makers – access to every single 24 difference between the open-source code and the proprietary code produced by Google. Apple 25 could want this request for one purpose only – to design claims for other litigation. Of course, 26 such a purpose is not permissible. Separately from the protective order governing this action, 27 Apple has failed to meet its burden required to pierce Google’s trade secret: 28 -13- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 [T]he requirements of relevance and necessity must be established where disclosure of a trade secret is sought . . . and that the burden rests upon the party seeking disclosure to establish that the trade secret sought is relevant and necessary to the prosecution or defense of the case before a court is justified in ordering disclosure. Hartley Pen Company v. United States District Court for the Southern District of California, 287 F.2d 324, 325 (9th Cir. 1961); In re Apple & AT & TM Antitrust Litig., No. 07-5152, Docket No. 276, 2010 WL 1240295 (N.D. Cal. Mar. 26, 2010) (“Because the iPhone source code is a trade secret, plaintiffs have the burden to establish that it is both relevant and necessary.”) (citing Hartley Pen). Apple’s sole justification for this request is that it “seek[s] information regarding the computer code supplied by Google to Samsung for incorporation into the Galaxy Nexus.” (Docket No. 135 at 10:8-9.) But this request does not seek “information regarding the computer code supplied by Google to Samsung for incorporation into the Galaxy Nexus,” which Google has already agreed to provide, but rather information comparing that code to other code. Apple’s asserted justification is both tepid and false; it certainly cannot pierce the protection for Google’s trade secret. 3. Apple Does Not Need This Information to Litigate This Action Apple has made this request in no fewer than five prior subpoenas to Google. (Appendix A at 2.) For the reasons stated above, Google has never provided this information. Nonetheless, Apple has managed to prosecute all of its pending Android actions, including through trial. There is a simple reason: Apple does not need this information to handle its current claims. Tellingly, Apple has provided no justification to the contrary. B. Apple’s Requests Regarding Apple Products Are Greatly Overbroad, Seeking Information Regarding Any Analysis of Any Apple Product – Information Apple Has Been Barred From Obtaining in Other Android Litigation In response to Requests and Topics Nos. 7 & 8, Google has already agreed to produce documents and testimony regarding “the design of, development of, implementation of and/or decision to implement” the accused functionality. To the extent “the design of, development of, implementation of and/or decision to implement” the accused functionality involved analysis of Apple products – a prospect which is quite doubtful, but which Google will carefully check – Google will produce documents and testimony regarding this analysis. But Apple wants more. -14- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 Requests and Topics Nos. 9 & 10 seek documents and testimony concerning analysis of “any 2 Apple product, including but not limited to Apple’s products that incorporate any version of the 3 iOS operating system as well as the Slide to Unlock, Text Correction, Unified Search, and Special 4 Text Detection software, features, or functionality.” (Docket No. 135-1. Ex. 3 (emphasis added).) 5 Apple’s request for any analysis of “any Apple product” is greatly overbroad, and 6 irrelevant to Apple’s claims in this action except when concerning the accused functionality – in 7 which case any documents or testimony would already be responsive to Requests and Topics Nos. 8 7 & 8. Indeed, Apple’s sole justification for these requests is that “Google’s [alleged] efforts to 9 copy the patented features is strong evidence that the patents are not obvious, i.e., invalid,” and 10 that “Google’s [alleged] inability to design around the four patented features, moreover, relates to 11 non-obviousness.” (Docket No. 135, 10:20 to 11:2 (emphasis added).) Apple cannot justify 12 requests concerning any analysis of any Apple product from this thin gruel. 13 Finally, it would be greatly burdensome if not impossible for Google to comply with this 14 request, which could require asking everyone at Google if they had ever analyzed an Apple 15 product in the course of their employment. A search both so burdensome and so irrelevant cannot 16 be permissible, and indeed Apple has already learned that it is not. In Apple v. HTC (I.T.C. 710), 17 Google successfully quashed Apple’s narrower request seeking only communications regarding 18 Apple products. (Martin Decl. Ex. 3 at 5.) The ALJ found deposition topics requiring “‘all 19 communications’ regarding Apple or ‘any Apple product’” to be “unduly burdensome and 20 impermissibly broad on their face.” (Id.) Apple’s requests here are much broader: they seek 21 documents and testimony regarding Google’s alleged internal analysis rather than external 22 communications. For the same reasons as in I.T.C. 710, the Court should bar Apple from pursuing 23 the unreasonable Requests and Topics Nos. 9 & 10, relying instead on the narrower scope of 24 Requests and Topics Nos. 7 & 8. 25 26 27 C. Although Apple’s Requests Regarding Consumer Surveys Are Overbroad, And Apple Has Failed to Subpoena Companies With Relevant Knowledge, Google Will Produce Any Documents Concerning the Accused Functionality Topics and Requests 11 & 12 seek documents and testimony regarding “ importance to 28 consumers and consumer purchasing decisions of” the accused functionality (Nos. 11) as well as -15- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 “the ability or capability to search the Internet on a phone or other mobile device.” (Nos. 12.) 2 Apple should not be entitled to discover Google’s consumer surveys (if any) in a case that alleges 3 infringement purely by Samsung. Until just this past week, Google did not even sell the Galaxy 4 Nexus to consumers; the bulk of these sales in the United States have so far come from Verizon, 5 which Apple has not subpoenaed. Nevertheless, to the extent they exist, Google will produce 6 (subject of course to its objections) documents and testimony responsive to Topic and Request 11, 7 which address the accused functionality. Topic and Request 12, however, go far beyond the 8 accused functionality to documents concerning as well as “the ability or capability to search the 9 Internet on a phone or other mobile device.” (Nos. 12.) 10 Apple admits this request does not address the accused functionality, structuring it as a 11 separate request and noting that it seeks “Documents relating to the importance to consumers of 12 the four accused, patented features as well as the importance to consumers of the ability to search 13 the Internet using a mobile device.” (Docket No. 135 at 5:13-15.) Nowhere does Apple’s brief 14 explain why or how the broad category of “the ability to search the Internet using a mobile device” 15 relates to the accused functionality, nor can it. As a result, the Court should deny Apple’s motion 16 regarding this request. 17 D. 18 Apple’s Loc. R. 37-2 statement included Deposition Topic 1, which seeks testimony Apple’s Topic No. 1 is Nonsensical And, In Any Event, Waived 19 regarding “All documents and source code produced pursuant to Apple’s Subpoena to Produce 20 Documents, Information or Objects served upon you on April 5, 2012, including without 21 limitation the authenticity thereof.” But Apple’s brief does not address or even mention Topic No. 22 1, waiving any claim of relief. In any event, Google cannot possibly provide testimony regarding 23 every single document it produces. The Court should deny any relief regarding Topic No. 1. 24 III. 25 The Court Should Not Allow Apple to Benefit From Using Its Willful Blindness And Delay to Engineer Its Own Emergency, And Then Asserting Its Manufactured Emergency To Prejudice Google 26 Apple also requests that the Court order Google to produce documents very quickly, so 27 that Apple can use them in preparing its reply brief. For two reasons, the Court should deny this 28 request. First, Apple asks the impossible. As Google has explained to Apple, to complete its -16- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 technical production in this action Google must collect documents from all four teams, including 2 some in Japanese; confirm that the documents it has collected are complete; assemble and train a 3 document review team; supervise and complete review for responsiveness to the Subpoenas; 4 consider and resolve the second-level questions that inevitably arise during first-level review; 5 review responsive documents for privilege and resolve second-level questions that arise during 6 this review; and supervise the vendor’s formatting and verification of documents for production. 7 Google simply cannot complete these steps before Apple’s reply brief is due. 8 Second, Apple’s request regarding timing depends on the premise that it was surprised to 9 discover that Google managed the build process for “Nexus” branded lead devices. But for at 10 least the past eighteen months, Apple has known that OEMs control the build process for non-lead 11 devices, but that Google controls the build process for lead devices, providing OEMs only with 12 compiled binaries. (See supra § A.) Armed with this knowledge, Apple has sought and received 13 lead-device source code from Google at least four times. (Id.) Despite this actual knowledge, in 14 this action Apple engaged in a sham attempt to obtain from Samsung information it knew 15 Samsung did not have, seeking delay in order to engineer an emergency. (Id.) 16 Apple’s motion thus rests entirely on a false premise: that Samsung was “stonewalling” by 17 telling Apple the truth – a truth it already knew – and that Apple’s delay in subpoenaing Google 18 was caused by anyone besides Apple. To make this argument, Apple conceals its own delay. 19 Apple argues that Apple “immediately sought from Samsung information regarding Galaxy 20 Nexus’ implementation of Ice Cream Sandwich.” (Docket No. 135 at 1:21-22.) This is not true, 21 unless “immediately” means “thirteen days later” – for that is how long Apple waited to serve 22 Samsung with its first discovery requests after the Court authorized preliminary injunction 23 discovery. Similarly, Apple argues that it “promptly served Google with a subpoena” after 24 Samsung explained it could not provide source code for the Galaxy Nexus because only Google 25 held that code. (Docket No. 135 at 2:1.) Again, this statement is correct only if “promptly” means 26 “nine days later” – the time between Samsung’s discovery responses and Apple’s service on 27 Google of a retread subpoena it could have served on February 22, 2012. (See Appendix A.) 28 Apple thus waited too long, not only by needlessly subpoenaing Samsung, but also by delaying its -17- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 requests to Samsung as well as its subpoenas to Google. The Court should not require Google to 2 perform the impossible by producing documents on Apple’s schedule. 3 IV. The Court Should Not Order Witness Testimony Beyond What Google Has Offered 4 Again, Apple’s failure to meet and confer has required the Court to learn issues not in 5 dispute between the parties. Google previously committed to provide witnesses on Topics 2, 7 & 6 8 regarding all of the accused functionality, and to do so before May 11, assuming Apple accepts 7 the schedule Google proposed this past Tuesday, April 24, 2012. The Court must therefore 8 resolve two issues: first, whether Apple is entitled to re-depose Mr. Wakasa; and second, whether 9 Google must provide witnesses on any other topics. 10 A. 11 Google repeatedly told Apple that Mr. Wakasa could only be deposed this past Friday, The Court Should Not Reward Apple’s Refusal to Depose Mr. Wakasa 12 April 27, 2012. (See supra § D). Notably, that same Friday was the date noticed by Apple for its 13 30(b)(6) deposition of Google on all twelve topics, not merely the ones for which Google 14 designated Mr. Wakasa. (Id.) Despite picking the day, Apple simply refused to show up. Apple 15 now seeks a new date for Mr. Wakasa, who has returned to his native Japan. It would be very 16 burdensome on Mr. Wakasa, if it is possible at all, for him to leave Japan over the two weeks 17 following the Golden Week. The Court should not reward Apple for refusing even to attempt to 18 depose Mr. Wakasa, and should not compel his renewed deposition. 19 B. 20 Subject to its objections, Google has agreed to provide testimony on Topics 5 and 11. But Google Cannot Provide Testimony on Topics 5 and 11 Before Apple’s Brief 21 it cannot do so before Apple must file its brief. Google is already preparing the four remaining 22 witnesses it has committed to provide on Topics 2, 7 & 8 regarding the accused functionality. 23 Because then nature of Topics 5 and 11 requires review of documents prior to testimony – unlike 24 the accused functionality, which largely if not entirely requires only review of source code – 25 Google cannot provide witnesses on these topics until it gathers, reviews and produces documents, 26 which it cannot do before Apple’s brief for all the reasons already stated. The Court should 27 therefore hold these depositions in abeyance until normal discovery. 28 -18- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 V. The Court Should Enter Google’s Requested Prosecution Bar 2 As they have in prior cases, Google and Apple have agreed on a few modifications to the 3 existing protective order governing confidentiality in this action. One area of dispute remains: 4 Apple wishes to allow its litigation counsel, armed with knowledge of Google’s highly 5 confidential source code, to participate in reexamination or reissue proceedings as long as they 6 avoid “participating in or advising on, directly or indirectly, claim drafting or amending claims.” 7 (Docket No. 135 at 18.) Google has asked Apple to articulate what attorneys could possibly do in 8 reexamination or reissue proceedings that is not “participating in or advising on, directly or 9 indirectly, claim drafting or amending claims,” but Apple declined to provide any examples. 10 Apple’s brief provides one, and it is telling: Apple suggests that “District Court counsel . . . may 11 have valuable accumulated knowledge on claim construction and prior issues.” (Id.) In Google’s 12 view, claim construction certainly falls under “participating in or advising on, directly or 13 indirectly, claim drafting or amending claims.” But this is precisely the problem – if Apple’s 14 counsel are allowed to participate in reexamination or reissue proceedings, Google will never 15 know how they are interpreting “participating in or advising on, directly or indirectly, claim 16 drafting or amending claims,” and will therefore never know if it is adequately protected. 17 Apple has a great many attorneys; it can surely find sufficient staffing to cover any 18 reexamination or reissue proceedings that may arise. Apple can cure its concerns by training more 19 attorneys, or by declining to share Google’s highly confidential source code with all of its 20 attorneys; but Google can never cure – indeed, will never know – if Apple’s lawyers interpret this 21 malleable language in a manner that harms Google. The Court should therefore enter a 22 prosecution bar with teeth, at least as applicable to highly confidential source code produced by 23 non-party Google. 24 VI. Apple’s Remaining Arguments are Premature 25 Apple devotes considerable space in its motion to inventing disputes that do not yet exist. 26 Apple devotes two pages to discussion of Google’s initial objections to its subpoenas, castigating 27 them as “boilerplate.” But these issues are not yet ripe; Google is simply reserving objections it 28 may make at a later time, when it actually produces documents. Similarly, Google has reserved -19- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 the right to assert a joint-defense privilege with Samsung. Apple does not contest that the 2 privilege exists, but asks the Court to rule on privilege issues before Google has completed its 3 production, or asserted any privilege. This is a classically unripe dispute, which courts are loathe 4 to consider. Watts v. Allstate Indemnity Co., 2010 WL 4225561 at *3 (E.D. Cal. Oct 20, 2010). 5 The Court in Watts succinctly summarized the problems with premature discovery motions: 6 7 8 9 10 11 The court, quite frankly, does not have the time to sort through an ill-conceived, unripe motion to compel, or worse yet, three of them. As set forth below, the court will order that the counsel in this case engage in civil, productive communication designed to elicit cooperation and the presentation of issues for the court to resolve in the future. What did become clear from the hearing was that the parties are still engaged in an ongoing meet and confer process and that there were very few issues properly before the court. What the undersigned also made clear is that although the court spent an inordinate amount of time seeking to provide the parties with guidance for going forward with discovery in this case, in the future the court will only rule on ripe, properly and narrowly presented issues which the parties have first attempted in good faith to resolve of their own accord. Very few of those issues are present in the instant dispute. 12 Id. The same is true here. Indeed, motions to compel privileged documents are categorically 13 premature if filed before privileged documents have been identified and withheld, and parties have 14 met and conferred concerning the privilege logs. See Nevada Power Co. v. Monsanto Co., 151 15 F.R.D. 118 at *122 (D. Nev. 1993). In Nevada Power, the court denied a motion to compel as 16 “not ripe for consideration” because “Plaintiff filed the instant motion without first demanding 17 production of the logs. Hence, meaningful attempts to resolve the dispute informally as required 18 by Rule 190-1(f)(2) were foreclosed.” Id. The Court should deny the remainder of Apple’s 19 motion as premature. 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 -20- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL 1 CONCLUSION 2 For all the foregoing reasons, the Court should deny Apple’s Motion in its entirety. 3 DATED: April 28, 2012 4 QUINN EMANUEL URQUHART & SULLIVAN, LLP 10 /s Matthew S. Warren Amy H. Candido amycandido@quinnemanuel.com Matthew S. Warren matthewwarren@quinnemanuel.com QUINN EMANUEL URQUHART & SULLIVAN, LLP 50 California Street, 22nd Floor San Francisco, California 94111-4788 (415) 875-6600 (415) 875-6700 facsimile 11 Attorneys for Non-Party Google Inc. 5 6 7 8 9 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 -21- CASE NO. 12-CV-00630-LHK GOOGLE’S OPPOSITION TO APPLE’S MOTION TO COMPEL