Oracle Corporation et al v. SAP AG et al

Filing 830

Declaration of Tharan Gregory Lanier in Support of 829 Memorandum in Opposition, filed bySAP AG, SAP America Inc, Tomorrownow Inc. (Attachments: # 1 Exhibit 1, # 2 Exhibit 2, # 3 Exhibit 3, # 4 Exhibit 4, # 5 Exhibit 5, # 6 Exhibit 6, # 7 Exhibit 7, # 8 Exhibit 8, # 9 Exhibit 9, # 10 Exhibit 10, # 11 Exhibit 11, # 12 Exhibit 12, # 13 Exhibit 13, # 14 Exhibit 14, # 15 Exhibit 15, # 16 Exhibit 16, # 17 Exhibit 17, # 18 Exhibit 18, # 19 Exhibit 19, # 20 Exhibit 20, # 21 Exhibit 21, # 22 Exhibit 22, # 23 Exhibit 23, # 24 Exhibit 24, # 25 Exhibit 25, # 26 Exhibit 26)(Related document(s) 829 ) (Froyd, Jane) (Filed on 9/9/2010)

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Oracle Corporation et al v. SAP AG et al Doc. 830 Att. 4 EXHIBIT 4 Dockets.Justia.com Function Point Counting Practices Manual Release 4.2 International Function Point Users Group (IFPUG) Function Point Counting Practices Manual Release 4.2 Chairperson, Counting Practices Committee Valerie Marthaler The David Consulting Group Clarkston, Michigan 2004 IFPUG. All Rights Reserved. International Function Point Users Group, 2004. Members of IFPUG may reproduce portions of this document within their internal counting practices manuals. If portions of this document are used, the following text must appear on the title page of the derivative document: "This document contains material that has been extracted from the IFPUG Counting Practices Manual. It is reproduced in this document with permission of IFPUG." ISBN 0-963-1742-9-0 Release 4.2, January 2004 This release replaces Release 4.1.1, which is now obsolete. Changes are made periodically to the information within. Documentation Team Subject Experts and Writers Bonnie S. Brown, EDS Martin D'Souza, Holistic Software Metrics E. Jay Fischer, JRF Consulting, Inc. Dave Garmus, The David Consulting Group Valerie Marthaler, The David Consulting Group Koni Thompson Houston, Quality Dimensions, Inc. Adri Timp, Interpay Nederland Eddy van Vliet, Chameleon Solutions For information about additional copies of this manual, contact IFPUG 191 Clarksville Road Princeton Junction, NJ 08550 U.S.A. (609) 799-4900 E-mail: ifpug@ifpug.org Web: http://www.ifpug.org 2 Overview of Function Point Analysis Introduction This chapter presents an overview of the function point counting process. It includes the objectives of function point counting and presents a summary and example of the function point counting procedures. This chapter includes the following sections: Topic Objectives and Benefits of Function Point Analysis Objectives of Function Point Analysis Benefits of Function Point Analysis Function Point Counting Procedure Procedure Diagram Procedure by Chapter Summary Counting Example Summary Diagram Determine the Type of Function Point Count Identify the Counting Scope and Application Boundary Determine the Unadjusted Function Point Count Determine the Value Adjustment Factor Calculate the Adjusted Function Point Count See Page 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-3 2-3 2-3 2-4 2-4 2-5 2-5 2-6 2-9 2-9 Contents January 2004 Function Point Counting Practices Manual 2-1 Overview of Function Point Analysis Part 1 Process and Rules Objectives and Benefits of Function Point Analysis Function point analysis is a standard method for measuring software development from the user's point of view. Objectives of Function Point Analysis Function point analysis measures software by quantifying the functionality the software provides to the user based primarily on logical design. With this in mind, the objectives of function point analysis are to: Measure functionality that the user requests and receives Measure software development and maintenance independently of technology used for implementation In addition to meeting the above objectives, the process of counting function points should be: Simple enough to minimize the overhead of the measurement process A consistent measure among various projects and organizations Benefits of Function Point Analysis Organizations can apply function point analysis as: A tool to determine the size of a purchased application package by counting all the functions included in the package A tool to help users determine the benefit of an application package to their organization by counting functions that specifically match their requirements A tool to measure the units of a software product to support quality and productivity analysis A vehicle to estimate cost and resources required for software development and maintenance A normalization factor for software comparison Refer to other IFPUG documents such as Function Points as an Asset for additional information about the benefits of function point analysis, or see the IFPUG web site at http://www.ifpug.org for additional information. 2-2 Function Point Counting Practices Manual January 2004 Part 1 Process and Rules Overview of Function Point Analysis Function Point Counting Procedure This section presents the high-level procedure for function point counting. Procedure Diagram C oun t Data Fu nc tio ns C oun t Tr ans ac tiona l Fu nc tio ns D et er mine Ty pe of C oun t I den tif y C oun tin g S c ope and A pp lica tio n Bou nda ry Determine U nad jus te d Fu nc tio n Point C oun t C alc ulate Adju st ed Function Poin t Count D et er mine Value Adju st men t Fa ctor Procedure by Chapter The following table shows the function point counting procedures as they are explained in the remaining chapters of the manual. Note: A summary example of the counting procedures is presented on the following pages in this chapter. Chapter 4 5 6 7 8 9 Procedure Determine the type of function point count. Identify the counting scope and application boundary. Count the data functions to determine their contribution to the unadjusted function point count. Count the transactional functions to determine their contribution to the unadjusted function point count. Determine the value adjustment factor. Calculate the adjusted function point count. January 2004 Function Point Counting Practices Manual 2-3 Overview of Function Point Analysis Part 1 Process and Rules Summary Counting Example This section presents a summary example of the function point counting procedure and the components that comprise the count. Summary Diagram The following diagram shows the components for the example function point count for a Human Resources Application. Refer to the diagram while reading the remaining paragraphs in this chapter. Us er 1 Req uest and Display Em pl o yee Information ( to g eth er = EQ) Currency Appli cati on Co nv ers io n Rate (EIF) N ew Employee I nf or mat ion (EI) H uman Resources Application Em pl o yee Information (ILF) Em pl o yee Report (EO) Us er 1 User 1 Boundary 2-4 Function Point Counting Practices Manual January 2004 Part 1 Process and Rules Overview of Function Point Analysis Determine the Type of Function Point Count The first step in the function point counting procedure is to determine the type of function point count. Function point counts can be associated with either projects or applications. There are three types of function point counts: Development project function point count Enhancement project function point count Application function point count The example on page 2-4 is for a project function point count, which will also evolve into an application function point count. Chapter 4 includes detailed definitions of each type of function point count. Chapter 9, the last chapter in Part 1, explains the formulas to calculate the adjusted function point count for each of the three types of counts. Identify the Counting Scope and Application Boundary The counting scope defines the functionality which will be included in a particular function point count. The application boundary indicates the border between the software being measured and the user. The example on page 2-4 shows the application boundary between the Human Resources Application being measured and the external Currency Application. It also shows the application boundary between the Human Resources Application and the user. Chapter 5 explains counting scope and application boundary. January 2004 Function Point Counting Practices Manual 2-5

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